Tag Archives: management

Satisfying a Demand for Dialog: Routine Employee Feedback is No Longer Optional

By Kate Zabriskie

Kate ZabriskieNot so long ago, most people in the workplace received feedback once-a-year during a performance review. An employee didn’t expect a development plan, a career track, or anyone to take an interest in his or her professional growth. That responsibility was often a solo activity. In fact, as recently as a couple of decades ago, there wasn’t a great deal of help on the road to career success, and most people didn’t complain. It simply was what it was.

But times change, and norms evolve. The practice of once-a-year feedback is fast becoming an anachronism and as out of place in the modern office as the fashions people once wore when holding those annual reviews.

The reason the average worker has evolved to expect a steady diet of attention and conversation is debatable and perhaps worth scholarly inquiry. In the meantime, however, a demand for dialog exists and must be answered.

So, why should managers take action, what does it take to establish and maintain an ongoing give-and-take, and how can managers balance the constant conversation with their own workplace responsibilities?

Why Bother to Give Regular Feedback

For some, accepting the new reality means moving past the fact that they came along when life was hard. Sorry, it’s time to get with the times, and get over it. Practices have evolved. If you don’t expect employees to accomplish their work with a typewriter and rotary-dial desk phone, then it shouldn’t be too hard to figure out that in addition to advances in technology, management practices have also improved.

First-class organizations have career paths, they invest in employee development, and their managers engage in regular dialog with their direct reports. Bottom line: If you want a top-notch worker, you better start acting like you know what to do with one.If you want a top-notch worker, you better start acting like you know what to do with one. Click To Tweet

How to Establish and Maintain a Dialog

Once you’ve bought into the notion that routine conversation is a must, the next step is knowing how to guide interactions.

1. Take an interest. Very little builds engagement as well as a manager who seems to genuinely care for people, promotes their success, and has the ability to develop them. This is not an annual affair. Rather, you’ve got to have a range of formal and informal conversations throughout the year. To get started, ask questions, and pay attention to the answers.

  • “What are you working on that’s exciting to you?”
  • “What aspects of your job do you enjoy the most?”
  • “If you could eliminate parts of your work, what would you stop doing?”
  • “What used to be interesting to you that’s now become mundane or boring?”
  • “If you could try something professionally with limited chance of failure, what risks would you take?”
  • “Tell me a little about what first attracted you to this organization. Has anything changed about how you feel about your work here?”
  • “How do you feel about our interactions? Do I give your development the right amount of attention, and do you receive the right amount of feedback?”

There is no limit to the questions you could ask. The key is showing a sincere interest in the answers, withholding judgement about what you’re told, and taking action when you can.

2. Be observant. As a manager, your job is to focus on the work that gets done and how it gets done. When you pay attention and are specific with your feedback, you show you’ve spent time to notice what’s working and where opportunities exist. In other words, it’s important to communicate to people they matter to you.

  • “Tim, I thought the graphics you used on those PowerPoint slides were very strong. You chose the unexpected, stayed away from heavy text, and did something a little different than what we are used to seeing. I think your approach answered the challenge Roger gave us to think outside the box.”
  • “Gina, I’d like to talk with you about the report submitted this morning. Specifically, I want to discuss the proofreading process you’re following. I noticed a few errors, and I want to see if there is a way we can reduce the mistakes. If we could increase the accuracy of the reporting, I think we would improve our department’s credibility. Is now a good time for you, or should I schedule something for this afternoon?”

Finding the Time for Planned Dialog

There is no clock fairy or magic solution to time management and fitting feedback and development conversations into a regular workload. It’s an effort that requires discipline. To ensure planned dialog happens, you need to put formal meetings on a calendar, schedule them at regular intervals, show up on time, and put the smartphone away.

The Payoff

While increased levels of informal feedback and scheduled conversation can seem overwhelming at first, the more often a manager engages, the easier it is, the franker the discussions become, and the greater the understanding between the employee and the manager grows.

With whom should you be having conversations?

Kate Zabriskie is the president of Business Training Works, Inc., a Maryland-based talent development firm. She and her team help businesses establish customer service strategies and train their people to live up to what’s promised. For more information, visit www.businesstrainingworks.com.

How to Deal with Remote Staff: Managing Employees That You Can’t See

Five Keys to Get the Most Out of Your Remote Staff

By Jan Makela

How to manage remote staff, by Jan MakelaOver 43 percent of the United States workforce is comprised of remote workers, that is, remote staff. The ability to work remotely is a powerful recruiting and retention tool for many companies. In addition to those obvious benefits, the organization also enjoys lower costs by saving on office-related expenses, and a boost in productivity as employees are no longer on long commutes.  

People will consider part time work if they are afforded the flexibility of not having to come into the office, and as not every role in company requires a full time employee, it can prove a perfect arrangement for the employer and employee.

But to get the most out of your work-from-home employees, you need to have some firm guidelines in place. Here are five keys to implementing a work-from-home system and methods to best manage your remote employees.Finding ways for your people to connect is the secret sauce to having successful employees that do not come to the office. Click To Tweet

1. Set Clear Expectations

Many managers worry that remote employees won’t work hard without supervision, but studies consistently show that remote employees are more productive than their office-based counterparts. When there are productivity problems, it’s most often due to unclear expectations, not slacking off. With the following strategies, you can ensure that your expectations are crystal clear.

Properly define what success looks like in the operational context of your organization. Have a frank conversation and discuss the definition of “success” for a particular project. Be sure that you and your remote staff have a shared vision. Set firm goals and identify the required outcome, and establish a timeline for specific milestones.

You should regularly check-in with your remote staff, monitor progress, and ensure that they are moving toward their goal in a timely fashion. If you’ve given clear direction on the required outcomes, you don’t have to make a personal judgement about whether someone is working hard. By investing time in the planning stage, it will pay off in productivity.

2. Relationships Matter

People are social creatures and need interaction to stay engaged. Building a good relationship with your remote employees ensures that they don’t feel isolated from the team. It also sets the foundation for good management. In a shared environment, relationship-building happens around the water cooler, in hallways, and before and after meetings. Without physical proximity, new avenues for relationship-building need to be used with remote workers.

Use instant messaging for the types of interactions you have in the hallways with office-based staff. Ask how their day is going, send a link to a helpful article or share a joke. You’re not going to just run into your remote employees, so connections require deliberate effort.

Set reminders in your calendar to make sure informal check-ins don’t get overlooked. Encourage a couple of minutes of personal chit-chat at the beginning of calls. Ask about their weekend, family or hobbies. Follow up on their comments from previous calls.

3. Be Available

Remote employees can’t stop by your desk when they need a quick answer, so it’s important that you set aside time to be available to them. Respond to messages promptly so you don’t hinder their productivity. If you can’t fully address a question right away, let them know you’re working on it.

Share your calendar. Sharing your calendar allows your remote staff to see when they have the best chance of catching you between meetings. Schedule regular check in times. Your remote staff can save their non-urgent questions for your regular meeting rather than sending multiple emails or instant messages.

Another avenue is video calls, which can build rapport by allowing colleagues to visually connect. It’s more personal than a voice on the phone or text in an email. Video calls offer another advantage—callers are more engaged and less likely to be distracted by emails or social media. Many video calling programs have polling options.

Add a personal touch by starting each meeting with a question. What method of communication do you prefer (email, IM, phone, video call)? What are your weekend plans? It’s also helpful to add a non-business touch, which will jump-start a personal connection—which has distinct business value. We learn a lot about each other visually. Create a shared picture folder. Invite team members to post an image of family or activities they have been involved in.

4. Communication

Communication takes extra effort when working remotely. To be effective, you must communicate clearly, often, and well.  When talking with someone in person, there are many subtle cues that add to the message. Facial expressions, gestures, body language, and tone of voice all help to interpret the speaker’s meaning. Those cues are often missing when communicating remotely. Be direct. Clearly state what you need and when you need it.

This reduces the need for follow up messages to clarify the request. Be warm and personable, but not overly familiar. Without non-verbal cues, jokes and casual comments can be easily misinterpreted. Share your progress. When you’re not in the same office, your colleagues don’t know what you’re working on. Let them know how projects are progressing. Share your barriers. Likewise, let your colleagues know what barriers you’re encountering and what help you need to address those barriers.

5. Connection to the Organization

You may find that remote employees lack the buy-in and engagement of those people was not as high as people who experienced some exposure to the home office. If your employee completely works from home, consider including them in home office training events and allow them to meet people that they may interact with but never see.

You may find that relationships improve and turnover of remote works decreases. Finding ways for your people to connect is the secret sauce to having successful employees that do not come to the office.

Both the employer and the employee—part or full time—can benefit from working remotely. For the employee the advantages may be obvious but employers also benefit from less overhead, increased cash flow and access to a larger talent pool. When implementing a work-from-home arrangement, it’s imperative to follow the five guidelines to best position your employee—and the company—for success.

Jan Makela is an executive coach, highly-sought after speaker, and best-selling author of Cracking the Code to Success and Be the Manager People Won’t Leave, for which he received the 2017 Quilly Award. Jan has a long and successful history of working with companies to ensure quality hiring and training practices. His specialty revolves around strength-based leadership development, with a particular focus on working with senior and mid-level executives, business owners, and professionals. For more information on Jan Makela, please visit www.StrengthBasedLeadership.net

The Deeper, Engaged Way to Onboard New Employees

By Cordell Riley

The days and weeks after employees start at your company represent a time of unique opportunity. Can you teach them new systems and skills? Of course you can. But have you also stopped to consider all the other important goals you can reach during the onboarding period? To name just a few, you can…

  • Grow and encourage adoption of your culture
  • Get new hires to understand, promote and believe in your brand
  • Sow the seeds for outstanding customer service
  • Cultivate the kind of spirit and energy that customers will value and love
  • Hear creative ideas from new employees who have a fresh perspective
  • Build retention by proving that your company is a great place to work
  • Set up communication channels with new hires that will improve operations throughout your company

Those are only a few of the opportunities you have during employees’ first weeks at your company. But how can you take advantage of them? Here are eight approaches that work.

Start by Having a Well-Defined Onboarding System

Many companies just wing it, with negative results. Still other companies see onboarding as little more than filling out forms, setting up company email accounts and showing new employees to their desks. Because new hires start their jobs without a deeper understanding of what is expected of them, they make mistakes that quickly become costly habits that must be corrected later on.

Many problems can be avoided if you set up a structured onboarding system that functions as high-level training. On their start days, new hires can meet individually with HR representatives to fill out forms, for example, and then meet as a group to watch videos and learn about your company, its brand and its values. After lunch, they can be trained in the basic skills their jobs demand; watching training videos, engaging in work simulations and working alongside current employees can work well to reach those goals. And after day one, they should attend regular follow-ups to address problems and reinforce basic concepts and skills.

The operative strategy is to clearly define ahead of time exactly the skills and behaviors you need, and to create a concise mini-curriculum that tracks to them.

Set up Genuine Mentoring Relationships between New Hires and Successful Current Employees

Remember, mentors’ goals should not be to get new hires to imitate what they do, or even to adhere to company systems. Their purpose is to discover what new employees would like to accomplish at your company, and to help them reach those goals. In short, mentoring is not about the mentors or strictly about your company, but about the employees who are being coached.

Find Ways to De-layer and Free Up Communications

Invite new employees to brainstorming sessions where their new ideas are collected, posted, discussed—and put into action when appropriate. Also consider setting up de-layered systems—like virtual suggestion boxes on your company intranet—where employees at all levels can present suggestions directly to top company executives. If employees can only submit ideas to their immediate managers, you have created a communication structure that carries a risk of demotivating front-line and entry-level personnel; just one supervisor who stifles new ideas can do great damage to your company.

Unless you commit your efforts to becoming an “employer of choice”—a company that people talk about and would love to work for—you are damaging your profits, operations and ultimately, your success. Click To Tweet

Don’t Do Training on the Cheap

One thing is for certain: if you are only handing out employee handbooks and having new employees fill out withholding forms, you are missing out on some great opportunities. If you can train every new retail salesperson to sell just 10% more on every order, for example, that could result in hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of new business company-wide, maybe even more. Or if you can set up mobile training that sends out pings to remind employees to use specific skills they learned in training, you could increase your training ROI dramatically. The lesson? Spending a little more to deliver great training is a money-maker, not a cost.

Within Your Budget, Customize Training for Each Employee

Even”standardized” training can be enriched by creating individualized training elements for each new employee. You can evaluate the skills of your new hires during training and address them directly, for example, or help employees overcome anxiety about performing certain parts of their new jobs. Investing just a little time to give training extra value can go a long way toward getting new employees up to speed faster.

Stress and Reinforce Your Mission Statement, Vision Statement and Strategic Company Plan

The onboarding period is a highly effective time to share the big picture about your company and to get employees to buy into your most important goals and priorities. Instead of waiting for employees to discover these critical priorities, start talking about them soon after new hires come on board.

Consider Creating a Career Plan for all New Employees

You won’t want to do this for seasonal or short-term employees. But for employees whom you would like to stay with you for the long term, consider sitting down with each of them to create individual career-development plans that spell out what they need to do to be promoted within your organization. You could say, for example, that all retail salespeople can apply for management training after six months of employment, or that your company will provide technical training to help them move into their desired career path at your company.

Millennials, especially, are more likely to stay with your company for the long term if they know the ropes and understand what it takes to build a long-term relationship with your organization.

Evaluate Whether You Are Acting like a Great Employer

This is something you should always do, not only when you are training a new class of employees. So take the time now to benchmark your company climate, benefits, quality of work/life balance and other factors against other companies. Unless you have the best of everything, you cannot expect your employees to commit their hearts and minds to working with you for the long term.

You see, retention starts with you, not with your employees. Unless you commit your efforts to becoming an “employer of choice”—a company that people talk about and would love to work for—you are damaging your profits, operations and ultimately, your success.

Cordell Riley is sought-after keynote speaker, and the Owner and President of Tortal Training, a leading training development company he founded in Charlotte, North Carolina. Tortal uses strategic engagement methodologies and specializes in developing mobile training platforms for organizations with distributed workforces. A recognized training expert with extensive experience in the service, automotive and franchising sectors, Cordell has spent more than twenty years helping thousands of companies achieve outstanding success through training. For more information about Cordell Riley, please visit: www.Tortal.net.

10 High-Impact, Low-Cost Ways to Drive Higher Levels of Employee Engagement and Help Your Customers Love You!

By Curt Redden

We all seem to get it by now—more engaged employees perform at a higher level. The organizations that get their strategy right in this area provide a superior customer experience; have lower levels of employee churn, higher morale, and ultimately much higher financial performance. Their customers love them more! What are some things you can easily implement that will give you big lift in your levels of employee engagement with the lowest investment?

First, hire right. Making the right hire is well over half of the battle in your employee engagement levels. Hire people who believe what you believe, and have the attitude you want. Get that right, and the following ten ideas can help them thrive.

1. Embrace and Adopt a Strengths-Focused Culture. People excel in their areas of talent and strengths. You can find many assessments to help you in this area. But the key is focusing on people’s strengths first. Identify them, and then figure out how you can stretch them in those areas. Once it takes hold, it impacts decision-making, structuring project teams, and the particular talents are required for a specific project. It does not mean you ignore their weaknesses, but your people become more engaged when doing what they naturally do best.

2. Volunteerism and Company Support from Top-Down. It’s important to help the communities in which you serve. You cannot underestimate the impact of allowing your people to volunteer (yes, even on company time). It is beyond giving back, it is team building, networking, and uniting around a common problem to overcome obstacles. In regards to engagement levels, this is one of the highest-rated items on many Employee Engagement surveys, and it is a multiplier in terms of return on happier and more satisfied employees.

3. Make Friends At Work. Some of you may be skeptical, but according to the 2017 Gallup Study of the American Workplace, having a best friend at work has a high correlation with engagement and higher productivity. But how can your organizations help support this? Formally, you can embrace deeper mentoring programs and relationships. This should be aligned in initial onboarding so the mentor can assist and facilitate introductions, networking, and group activities. Informally, the more in and out of work activities that you can schedule aids in bonding, networking, and ultimately friendships.

4. Establish “Fun” Committees! Whatever you call or brand your internal efforts to schedule fun stuff, give it to the people who are passionate, and let them run. Never underestimate the impact of happy hours, food trucks, bowling and other fun activities to help your people get to know each other better on a personal level, and perform better in teams.

5. Flexibility. Wherever possible, err on the side of providing more flexibility for your people. You hired them so hopefully you trust them, and if you don’t you probably should not keep paying them. It is about the “job to be done” and not where it gets done from. Working from home a day or two a week or extending flex time goes a long way in helping people better balance their lives.

6. Contact with Senior Management. Leadership by simply walking around is a really big deal. Have your senior staff pop in on random employees to just see what they’re most excited about working on. Top organizations in engagement consistently show that access and informality with senior staff drives employees to feel more comfortable, enjoy their work more, and provide more discretionary effort.

7. Really Celebrate Successes and Wins. When someone does something awesome, find ways to recognize and reward the behavior you want. It is amazing how many employees still only get feedback primarily when they have done something wrong. So many leaders simply expect great performance, and then think they are providing fantastic coaching and leadership when they rip apart someone’s performance that screwed up. That management style is already going the way of the dinosaur if you are really looking to attract and retain the top employees of tomorrow.

8. Extend Trust to Get Trust. Play a game of “What Rule or Outdated Process Can We Kill?” Once a quarter, include in any regular scheduled meetings, “Keep it, or Kill” it as an exercise. Employees get to nominate rules or processes they believe do not add value. Leadership still has veto authority, but the goal should be able to kill at least one (and you can’t add one to replace it). There are so many areas you can see this have impact. Often times, entire rules and procedures are put in place to avoid a few exceptions. Again, if you trusted them enough to hire them…

9. Extend Trust to Get Trust (Part 2). Your people are on social media. While there are some specific instances of needed prohibition of access to some sites and/or personal devices, the best companies are moving towards the understanding that people are increasingly not separating their work and personal lives. Embrace this! Regarding social media specifically, encourage and help your people to be brand ambassadors on all platforms, not just the ones you think are for business.

10. Let Your People be Authentic and They Will be Their Best for You. We have finally reached a tipping point where the vast majority of organizations understand the value of diversity in their teams. They not only get it, they strive to leverage it for a competitive advantage. Appearance standards have shifted drastically of late, as many companies are now not only allowing, but encouraging, unique looks and individuality in their employees. Some companies are hesitant to permit their staff to work with visible tattoos, facial hair, or body piercings—especially if they are seeking to maintain a carefully curated brand—but where possible allow your people do be themselves. The key is getting and keeping the best talent, not the talent you thinks looks the best (unless that’s your goal). You should seek employees who are passionate, talented and believe in what you believe. Those are the ones who become truly engaged and deliver the ultimate customer experience and help build the brand you deserve.

All ten of these tips can help you immediately in your employee engagement efforts at a relatively low cost. The key differentiator for organizations moving forward will be in how they become an employer of choice for pool of top talent. It is not just about happy and satisfied employees—it is about those who are able to bring their best effort and energy to work each day. Those are the ones who become truly engaged and deliver the ultimate customer experience and help you build the loyalty you deserve.

Curt Redden is a speaker, talent-development expert, and co-author of Going PRIMAL, A Layered Approach to Creating the Life You Desire. Curt has spent more than twenty-five years working to support and encourage employees as they strive for success. He currently is the head of global talent development for a Fortune 50 company. He is also certified by the Association for Talent Development as a master trainer and performance-improvement consultant. For more information on Curt Redden, please visit: www.primalsuccess.com.

Teaching Employees to Execute Customer Service Magic: The Four Aces to an A+ Rating

By Kostya Kimlat


Kostya KimlatA sale, like a great magic trick, occurs inside the customer’s mind. And it is there where it is replayed, remembered, and redefined continually after. The mind is the final battleground. Because magicians are masters of perception, they understand how to get into the heads of their prospects better than anyone else. That’s why the principles of magic can be so helpful in a business environment.

The following four tools and techniques are used in magic to create the perception of magical experiences. These four words begin with the letter ‘A.’ So we’ll call each of them the proverbial “Ace Up The Sleeve.” They’re not just a part of a winning hand. When executed together, they are a part of a winning strategy of customer service.

Here are the four aces from a magician’s tool set of perception:

  • What assumptions are your customers making?
  • How are you acknowledging them?
  • How are you building anticipation to heighten emotions?
  • And what are you doing to surprise, delight, and ultimately astonish your customers.

1. Assumptions: People are constantly making assumptions. Magicians use the assumptions that the human brain naturally makes “against” you.  Assumptions are the reason why it’s so fun for magicians to fool other magicians. That’s because a prepared magician will know what methods his magician friend knows, and use those very assumptions to pull off his trick in a way his friend won’t expect, leaving him dumbfounded.

Assumptions impact every interpersonal interaction and can be helpful or hurtful. First, consider what assumptions you are making about your customers. Are you assuming they like you, your brand or your product? Or are you assuming they’re skeptical of you?

Second, think about what assumptions they are making of you. People perceive what they expect, so before you can deliver on any customer service, you need to get into the mind of your customer, client or patient, and understand what they’re assuming is going to happen when they interact with you.

Perception is a two-way street: people see you and you see them. It is therefore imperative to first become aware of the assumptions that you make about others. Then it’s equally as important to consider how others see you. This will help you have an influence over the impact of perception on your relationships.An excellent magician will not just bring a trick to its successful conclusion—he will go an extra step. Click To Tweet

2. Acknowledgment: A human interaction can only be successful if the customer’s assumptions are acknowledged.  For example, the sophisticated magician who encounters a spectator oozing with negative assumptions about magic must first acknowledge those assumptions in order to move forward.

“You look skeptical,” the magician might say. “How about I show you the fastest trick I do, and if you enjoy it, I can come back later and show you more?”

Acknowledgment communicates authenticity. For businesses and brands, it can be the saving mea culpa that redeems a company from a mistake. For individuals, it is a way of clearing the air before being able to move forward in a relationship.

What are the assumptions—true or false—your prospective customers most frequently make about you or your business?  What can you say or do to acknowledge each of those assumptions, in order to proceed with the relationship?

3. Anticipation: Once you’ve identified your customer’s assumptions and then acknowledged them, you’re ready to build anticipation.

Studies have shown that your mind is in a constant state of anticipation, making predictions about the future, and then rewarding or punishing you for being right or wrong. This is what makes magic so much fun to watch—your brain is constantly making predictions about how a trick might end. And when your brain guesses correctly, it’s rewarded handsomely.

There are many ways a magician might increase your anticipation levels. Sometimes, he’ll tell you exactly how the trick will end (“all of the cards will disappear in 3…2…1…”).  Sometimes, he might even create anticipation through tension, by feigning an error (“I swear this worked earlier…”)—before successfully completing an effect to the delight of the audience.

Master magicians know how to raise the level of anticipation—and ultimately the astonishment that is about to come. Creating anticipation is an ultimate tool of perception, a masterful tactic that can create intrigue and heightened emotions, leading to a better payoff in the end.

Like a magician, you can raise anticipation levels in a sales interaction by painting a picture of how the customer’s future might look. What can you say to get a customer excited about a future payoff? What emails could you send to heighten this sense of anticipation? Is there a way you can create anticipation through generating tension?

Think about how you can build, build, build anticipation so that when a customer finally makes her purchase, she feels like it’s a cause for celebration!

4. Astonishment: Have you ever been amazed by a magician? Have you seen or experienced something that made you take pause? Your eyes widened, your pupils dilated, your mouth got dry. For a brief moment you couldn’t explain what just happened. This positive and pleasantly surprising moment has an eerie way of zapping your brain like nothing else does. Magicians refer to this as the moment of astonishment.

Excellent customer service comes down to how well you’re able to astonish your customer. Sure, a customer might have assumptions that you may have acknowledged, and you might even deliver on what she anticipated would happen.

But unless you go an extra step, providing something she previously thought unlikely or impossible, she will not walk away feeling astonished.

Astonishment taps into your customer’s emotional brain, and it’s in the emotional brain that brand loyalty becomes rooted and repeat business generated. Astonishment is what leads to five star Yelp reviews and unsolicited Facebook posts singing your glories.

Just like an astonished audience member might excitedly request that a magician “do that again,” or demand a magician share a performance—”show that to my friend!”—your customers will want to experience your business again and share it with friends if you leave them truly astonished.

So how can you add moments of astonishment to your interactions? What surprises can you plan? How can you take things a step beyond meeting their anticipated expectations and deliver something they wouldn’t have imagined possible?

Stack the deck to win the game:

A competent magician will understand the assumptions his audience is making about him. A good magician will acknowledge them. A great magician will build so much anticipation that the audience creates an expectation for the successful conclusion of a trick. But an excellent magician will not just bring a trick to its successful conclusion—he will go an extra step, not only delivering on the promise, but exceeding it and surprising the audience.

Excellent magicians have all four “aces” up their sleeves. You don’t have to be a magician to use these tools, you just have to Think Like A Magician™. Teach these tactics to your employees, and they’ll be masters at delivering magical customer service.

Kostya Kimlat is a keynote speaker and corporate magician who fooled Penn & Teller on their hit TV show, “Fool Us”. Kostya speaks to businesses about how to Think Like A Magician™ to improve sales and customer service.