Tag Archives: marketing

Your Book as Your Business Card

Indie Book Publishing Provides Professionals the Edge

By Keith Ogorek

Keith Ogorek-Book as Your Business Card

What is 6” by 9,” usually weighs roughly one pound, and is giving an increasing number of business leaders an advantage over the competition? A book.

Thanks in large part to the explosion of Indie book publishing, the use of ‘the book as a business card’ has added a new and powerful tool to the marketing arsenal of many successful business people. For a few hundred dollars, seasoned experts and professionals are putting their knowledge into professionally-published books—a calling card sure to make a much bigger impression than the traditional business card.

A prospective customer isn’t going to necessarily care who published the book—they’re going to read it and discover that you really do know what you’re talking about Click To Tweet

Marketing—especially for businesspeople in consulting and service industries—is about credibility, and a book establishes a person as someone who has reached a level of expertise. It allows readers (potential clients) to learn more about their philosophies, thought process and successful case studies, much more so than a simple brochure. And, you don’t have to be published by a major house to achieve and utilize this credibility. Authors are proving that it doesn’t matter if a book is self-published—the end result in terms of marketing benefits is the same.

Imagine one business consultant calling on prospective customers with traditional marketing materials, and another calling on the same customers and supplementing materials with a book written about the field of expertise. Who do you think has the better chance of landing that sale?

Securing extra income from book sales typically isn’t paramount for business authors. Media coverage in the form of book reviews, interviews and feature stories not only spreads the word about the author to their target business groups, but also provides excellent fodder for meetings with prospects, and priceless material for other marketing collateral.

The marketing power of TV and radio shows appearances or an expert’s book featured in various public and trade publications is undeniable. Once again, it is the book that makes the media interested in the author; another benefit of publishing.

One case in point is AuthorHouse author Stacey Hanke, whose book Everything You Need From A to A To Z To Influence Others to Take Action, has received interest from over 120 media outlets.

“My book has given me the opportunity to promote my business in ways I could not have done before,” says Hanke.

Randy Petrick, a writer, speaker, and money coach with more than thirty years of experience teaching financial concepts, has received nationwide media attention for his book Money Games: 85 Ways to Save Money and Attract Abundance. Petrick’s book and expertise has made him a particularly attractive source for the media in light of the recent economic difficulties and many Americans’ increased focus on stretching their dollars.

“Writing and publishing Money Games has been a wonderful opportunity to enhance my business as a financial consultant,” says Petrick. “I can’t imagine a better ‘business card’ in these financial times than my book.”

The expansion in the popularity of Indie book publishing, more commonly referred to as self-publishing, is drawing attention from prominent media in a time when publishing as a whole is experiencing contraction. Recent features in the Time Magazine and The New York Times draw a distinct contrast in ‘old publishing’—which was often fraught with obstacles and disappointment for prospective authors—and indie book publishing which is opening up the goal of publishing a book to everyone, including business professionals.

If you’re a business person selling your services, a prospective customer isn’t going to necessarily care who published the book—that’s not their mindset—they’re going to read it and discover that you really do know what you’re talking about, and you’ve proven it in the book.

Keith Ogorek is Vice President of Marketing for Author Solutions, Inc. (ASI) ASI, owned by Bertram Capital Management LLC, is the world leader in indie book publishing—the fastest-growing segment of publishing. ASI’s self-publishing brands: AuthorHouse, AuthorHouse UK, iUniverse, Xlibris, Wordclay and Inkubook; have helped more than 70,000 authors self-publish, promote, and bring to market more than 100,000 new titles. In 2008, one out of every 20 new U.S. titles was published by an ASI brand—more than any publisher in the world. Headquartered in Bloomington, Indiana; ASI also operates offices in New York City; Indianapolis; Milton Keynes, England; and Cebu, Philippines. Visit www.authorsolutions.com or call 877-655-1722 for more information.

The Threat of “Do-Not-Mail”

By Peter Lyle DeHaan , PhD

Author Peter Lyle DeHaan

Five years ago, the call center industry was confronted head on with the DNC (Do-Not-Call) legislation. As millions signed up to block most telemarketing calls to their home, the pool of prospect numbers shrank dramatically. Since then, the face of outbound calling in the United States has been unalterably changed. Today, DNC registration has surged past the 100 million mark, with more residences now on the list than not. The latest development is that phone numbers on the registry have been made permanent, not expiring after five years as originally planned.

Given the immense popular support of the DNC legislation, politicians – seeing an opportunity to win votes and generate good PR – began introducing all sorts of bills to further regulate and restrict the manner and mode of marketing efforts. One such area of attack is “Do-Not-Mail” legislation.

According to Jerry Cerasale, SVP of Government Affairs for the Direct Marketing Association (DMA), there are currently Do-Not-Mail bills pending in eleven states: Hawaii (both in the house and senate), Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vermont, and Washington. Soon, enough states will have joined this initiative that a tipping point will occur, prompting action at the federal level. (Federal action is not all bad, as it will help usher in a single set of regulations with which to comply, hopefully replacing a patchwork of differing and diverging state requirements.)

According to the USPS 2007 Annual Report, over 74 billion pieces of mail were sent last year. Direct mail was cited by Cerasale to account for about one third of that.

The Do-Not-Mail bills pose a danger to the cost-effective viability of the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). The USPS management, staff, delivery schedule, and infrastructure all operate at a requisite level of mail volume. The revenues generated from that mail supports the current scale of operation and efficiency at the post office. If revenues drop, then the operational status quo cannot be supported and maintained. The result would be either that prices would need to take a huge jump or services would need to be drastically curtailed. This could include the hours that post offices are open, closing smaller, less used offices, eliminating Saturday delivery, or only delivering mail every other day. (One option is that half the routes would be Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and the rest would be Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. Another option would simply be to pick up and deliver mail every other day, Monday through Friday.)

This is not a far-fetched scenario. Since about one third of all mail is direct mail, as Do-Not-Mail bills are implemented, the number of households to which unsolicited mail could be legally sent would decrease. Imagine a national Do-Not-Mail law with the same popularity and registration level as DNC. A large percentage of direct mail would cease to be sent, the USPS revenues would fall, and huge postage increases and/or dramatic service cuts would be made. Just as DNC permanently changed outbound call centers, Do-Not-Mail would forever and irrevocably affect postal service.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is a published author and commercial freelance writer who provides content marketing services.

How to Make a Book Cover Design that Flies Off the Shelf!

By Karen Saunders

Karen Saunders-BOOK COVER DESIGN

According to “The Wall Street Journal”, “The average bookstore browser who picks up a book spends eight seconds looking at the front cover and 15 seconds reading the back.” You can’t tell—but you can sell—a book by its cover.” Here are a few powerful book cover design techniques that professional book designers use:

The essential elements for your front cover

The front cover presents your book title, subtitle, and your name. Golden opportunities often overlooked are including endorsements and short testimonials from VIPs.

Think of your cover like a billboard. The best designs communicate the book’s message at a glance, with simple, uncluttered design. Unique, distinctive, bold, colorful graphics work well. But keep the graphic style consistent with the content and personality of the book. Make sure there is a central focal point to your design. Book cover design is a form of packaging—and good packaging attracts buyers to products. Click To Tweet

I recommend using bold, contrasting lettering on the front cover. When choosing colors, consider how these colors will look when converted to black and white so your cover will reproduce well in black and white ads, catalogs, and flyers. Also make sure the font you use for the title is legible from a distance and appropriate for the book’s subject.

Covers that scream “amateur” and have a “made-at-home look” make it difficult to sell your book at all. If you lack talent in this area, seek the services of an experienced book cover designer. A professional designer has the creativity, skills, software, access to stock photography, and printing knowledge that will make your cover stand out above others in the marketplace.

What should you put on your spine

Your name, book title, and publishing company logo show up on the spine. Make sure the information on the spine is clean, uncluttered, and legible. I recommend using bold, contrasting lettering on the spine as well.

Critical items you should include on your back cover

Place the category name in the upper left-hand corner to help bookstores shelve your book properly. Write a headline that clearly addresses who should buy the book. It should be followed by sales copy explaining what the book is about. Then provide a short bulleted list of benefits to readers.

I recommend including no more than three testimonials and endorsements, as well as your bio and photograph. Close to the bottom, put “sales-closer” copy in bold print. Position the price in the lower left corner of the back cover. Also include the 13-digit ISBN number for cataloging and the bar code in the lower right corner (below ISBN number), which stores use for scanning information and price.

Don’t forget to include credits for your book cover’s illustrator, photographer, and/or designer.

What goes on the inside flaps (If Applicable)

  • Sales copy
  • Short “teaser” description of the book
  • Your bio and photo

You now have a good idea of what makes a strong book cover design. Remember, book cover design is a form of packaging—and good packaging attracts buyers to products. That’s why successful organizations spend millions researching and developing the best product packaging possible.

Karen Saunders is the author of the e-book, “Turn Eye Appeal into Buy Appeal: How to easily transform your marketing pieces into dazzling, persuasive sales tools!” Karen has produced thousands of successful marketing projects and has designed the covers of 18 books that have become best-sellers or won awards, including a “Writer’s Digest” Grand Prize winner for the best self-published book in America. Contact her at 888-796-7300.

The Impending “Do Not Market” Threat

By Peter Lyle DeHaan , PhD

Author Peter Lyle DeHaan

Have you heard about the onslaught of Do Not Market laws proposed at the local, state, and federal level? You haven’t? Well, there is good reason that this pending legislation has caught you unawares. The fact is that it doesn’t exist – per se.

However, in reality there is a plethora of existing laws and proposed legislation that serve to significantly restrict how we all market our products and services. In total, these well-intended but overreaching and imprudent bills combine to effectively amount to one massive Do Not Market law. What is at stake is our ability to promote our businesses and make sales. Once these restrictions are placed on every business, the future of the U.S. economy and its viability as a nation will be in jeopardy.

Less you think this is hyperbole, consider what would happen if you were effectively prohibited from any and all marketing activities. You would be forced to rely on a “build it and they will come” approach to sales. In effect, this would reduce your sales and marketing departments to the mode of reactive order-taker. What would happen to your sales numbers? Most likely business would decline, maybe even going into a free fall. You would stop hiring and begin laying off staff; capital investments would be put on hold; expansion plans would be terminated. This would ripple through the economy, and a recession would follow.

Okay, I admit, this is a tad bit reactionary. But if we truly couldn’t do any marketing, this becomes a dreadfully real and inevitable scenario. Surely, you say, our elected officials wouldn’t go so far as to legislate our economy into disarray by prohibiting all forms of marketing – would they? Let’s review:

  • For several years, we have been prohibited from sending unsolicited faxes. What was once viewed as an efficient and cost-effective alternative to direct mail was summarily made illegal. Nix the fax.
  • The bellwether bill was the national Do Not Call law and its numerous state counterparts. This devastated calling consumers. Given its immense public support and self-serving political expediency, we should also expect similar future limitations placed on contacting businesses via phone.
  • The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 (yes, it was four years ago) put onerous restrictions on email marketing messages and solicitations. Since enforcement of this act is both challenging and cumbersome, it has yet to make a dent in spam, its intended target, which continues to grow unrelentingly. It has, however, given conscientious businesses pause in what content they include in email messages and to whom they send them. The honest have been dissuaded, while the crooks continue unabated. Plus, with the implementation of spam filters at numerous junctures along the path of an email message, there is serious doubt as to how often our carefully crafted and legally compliant messages actually get through to the intended recipient. To make things even more cumbersome on the law-abiding, there are proposed Do Not Email bills floating about.
  • Consider direct mail. The postal rate hike was discouraging enough, but many Do Not Mail bills are in the works as well. So, even if we can afford it, mailing promotional items may become moot.
  • Many other forms of marketing are facing restrictions on a local or regional basis, including billboards, the use of spotlights and PA systems, door-to-door selling, handing out flyers, the size and placement of signage, and so forth. Used wrongly, these can be deemed a nuisance by the buying public, but why should everyone be penalized for a few overzealous marketers?

What is left? Certainly broadcast marketing (radio and TV) is one option. With broadcast media, there are already many balanced, appropriate, and accepted laws on the books that govern ad content. Nothing more is in the works at this time. Unfortunately, radio and TV are not effective media for many businesses and out of the question for many marketing budgets. Besides, with the proliferation of DVRs (digital video recorders), how many viewers are zipping past those television commercials anyway? Concerning radio, be aware that more and more listeners are finding their music online, effectively bypassing commercial radio.

Perhaps the most viable remaining category is print media (newspapers, magazines, and newsletters). Like broadcast advertising, print media enjoys time-tested legislation that regulates what can and cannot be included in ads. Print media can be distributed according to a subscription-based model (readers pay to receive it) or an advertiser-based model (companies pay for it to be sent to qualified individuals).

There are two challenges with print advertising. The first is finding the right publication that addresses your target audience. The second is designing an effective ad. Herein is the painful reality of print advertising: a great ad makes things happen; a bad ad does nothing. Interestingly, the only threat to print advertising is not legal, but rather environmental, since no-longer-needed copies end up in the landfill. (This could be the impetus for future legislation.) To address the issue of paper waste, many publications offer electronic alternatives. Over 10 percent of Connections Magazine subscribers currently receive their copies this way; Byte magazine has been 100 percent online for over ten years. This is definitely a trend of the future.

Last, but certainly not least, is the Internet. In the World Wide Web there resides all sorts of interesting and intriguing promotional opportunities. Website sponsorships and banner ads are two prominent options. Search engine advertising is growing at a phenomenal rate. Certainly, having a company website is a requirement. Trying to market in today’s economy without a website is a foolish and shortsighted endeavor, filled with frustration and wasted resources. Increasingly, companies that lack websites are immediately dismissed by prospective customers, who view them as second rate or, worse yet, not even viable. For the progressive, future-focused promoter, consider how SecondLife, MySpace, and FaceBook fit into your marketing mix.

So faxing, calling, emailing, mailing, and broadcasting are increasingly limited marketing options (even when there is an “existing business relationship”). The remaining opportunities exist in the worlds of print media and Internet marketing, which may well become the final frontier of advertising and emerge as the only effective and successful marketing medium in the future.

Peter Lyle DeHaan, PhD, is a published author and commercial freelance writer who provides content marketing services.